Plenary Dialogues

In the spirit of a community of artists, the conference will feature
three plenary dialogues rather than individual speakers.

Linda Leavell and Susan McCabe will dialogue about patronage, friendship, and money in the creation of creative spaces.

Linda Leavell

Linda Leavell’s biography of Marianne Moore, Holding On Upside Down: The Life and Work of Marianne Moore, won the PEN/Jacqueline Bograd Weld Award in biography, the Plutarch Award for the best biography of 2013, and the 2014 MSA Book Prize. It was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Pegasus Award for Poetry Criticism. Her first book is the award-winning critical study Marianne Moore and the Visual Arts: Prismatic Color. Leavell was a professor of American literature for twenty-five years at Oklahoma State University.

Susan McCabe

Susan McCabe

Susan McCabe is the author of four books, including two critical studies—Elizabeth Bishop: Her Poetics of Loss (Penn State University Press, 1994) and Cinematic Modernism: Modern Poetry and Film (Cambridge University Press, 2005)—and two poetry volumes, Swirl (Red Hen Press, 2003), and Descartes’ Nightmare (winner of the Agha Shahid Ali prize and published by Utah University Press in 2008).  Her current research, however, marks a transition from writing in the genres of scholarly criticism and poetry to biography. She’s working on a first full-length study, A Modernist Love Story: H.D. and Bryher. Susan McCabe is a professor of English at the University of Southern California Dornsife.

Jane Garrity and Helen Southworth will engage in conversation about “obscurity” and its relation to women.

Jane Garrity

Jane Garrity

Jane Garrity is the author of Step-Daughters of England: British Women Modernists and the National Imaginary (Manchester University Press, 2003); the editor of a special issue on “Queer Space,” ELN: English Language Notes (Spring 2007); and the co-editor, with Laura Doan, of Sapphic Modernities: Sexuality, Women, and National Culture (Palgrave Macmillan, 2006). She is currently at work on a book titled Material Modernism: Fashioning Bloomsbury. Jane Garrity is an associate professor of English at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Helen Southworth

Helen Southworth

Helen Southworth’s first book, The Intersecting Realities and Fictions of Virginia Woolf and Colette, was published by Ohio State University Press in 2004. She also coedited Woolf and the Art of Exploration in 2007. Her edited volume Leonard and Virginia Woolf, the Hogarth Press and the Networks of Modernism appeared with Edinburgh University Press in October 2010 [paperback 2012]. Southworth is currently at work on a biography of interwar British writer and musician Francesca Allinson. She is also collaborating with colleagues in the U.S., Canada and the U.K. on a digital humanities project focused on modernist publishing. Helen Southworth is an associate professor of literature at the University of Oregon.

Melissa Bradshaw and Madelyn Detloff will discuss the role of “big-personality” modernist women writers on making and breaking the literary reputations of their female contemporaries.

Melissa Bradshaw

Melissa Bradshaw

Melissa Bradshaw, winner of the 2011 MLA Book Prize for Independent Scholars for her book Amy Lowell, Diva Poet, teaches in the English department at Loyola University Chicago. Her research focuses on publicity, personality, and fandom in twentieth century American literature and popular culture. She has published extensively on the poet Amy Lowell, co-editing a volume of her poems as well as a volume of scholarly essays about her. She has also published on Edith Sitwell, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and on divas more generally. She is currently working on an edition of Amy Lowell’s collected letters and a book on female poets and material culture, titled Collectable Women: Ephemera and the Poetry Archive.

Madelyn Detloff

Madelyn Detloff

Madelyn Detloff is an associate professor of English and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies at Miami University.  Her book, The Persistence of Modernism: Loss and Mourning in the 20th Century, examines the role of female metic modernists in forging non-lethal, resilient responses to loss, calamity, and trauma. She has published several essays on feminist studies, Woolf, H.D., queer theory, and cultural studies pedagogy in venues such as Hypatia, Women’s Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, ELN, Literature Compass, the MLA Approaches to Teaching series, MMLA, and Modernism/modernity. Detloff is a former vice president of the International Virginia Woolf Society and former co-chair of the H.D. International Society. She is currently completing a book on The Value of Woolf for Cambridge University Press and co-editing a volume on Queer Bloomsbury.

 

elise.nicolPlenary Dialogues